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Trail closure July 20-31 near Snoqualmie for vital repairs to Meadowbrook Bridge

Summary

Crews will begin maintenance to the Meadowbrook Bridge along the Snoqualmie Valley Trail. Trail users should expect closure of the trail section to run from July 20-31.

Story

A safety project to replace rotted portions of the Meadowbrook Bridge along King County Parks’ Snoqualmie Valley Trail will require a two week closure of the trail in the immediate area, July 20-31.3929447942_833f45a556_b

The project will involve removing portions of the railing and concrete deck panels to repair rotten stringers and pile caps on the south side of the Meadowbrook Bridge, near the city of Snoqualmie. These repairs were identified during the recent stairway and deck reconstruction on the north end of the bridge, which was damaged in an arson fire in 2014.

In advance of the week-long closure, trail users could expect intermittent delays of up to 30 minutes as crews erect the scaffolding that is needed to make the bridge repairs. The $45,000 project is funded through the King County Parks Levy and is part of the ongoing Bridge & Trestle Program, which inspects and maintains the 76 bridges and trestles along the county’s 175-mile regional trail system.

The 31-mile-long Snoqualmie Valley Trail is the longest trail in the county’s system, which plays an important role in supporting King County communities’ health, economy, mobility, equity and social justice, environment, and recreation. The trail winds through the largely rural Snoqualmie River Valley, passing working farms and forests, as well as the cities of Duvall, Carnation, Snoqualmie and North Bend.

The trail connects with the cross-state John Wayne Pioneer Trail at its southern end and offers access to such notable destinations as Meadowbrook Farm and King County’s Tolt-MacDonald Park and Three Forks Natural Area.

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About King County Parks
King County Parks - Your Big Backyard - offers more than 200 parks and 28,000 acres of open space, including such regional treasures as Marymoor Park and Cougar Mountain Regional Wildland Park, 175 miles of regional trails, 215 miles of backcountry trails and a world-class aquatic center. By cultivating strong relationships with non-profit, corporate and community partners, King County Parks enhances park amenities while reducing costs.