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King County Executive
Dow Constantine


As state climate debate heats up, local governments call for action to cool down

Summary

King County Executive Dow Constantine and Mayors from the cities of Mercer Island, Kirkland, Issaquah, Shoreline, Snoqualmie, Sammamish, Seattle, and Tukwila have issued a joint letter calling for bold state action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Story

King County Executive Dow Constantine and Mayors from the cities of Mercer Island, Kirkland, Issaquah, Shoreline, Snoqualmie, Sammamish, Seattle, and Tukwila have issued a joint letter calling for bold state action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. 

The joint letter calls for bold state action, including establishment of market-based tools to set a price on climate pollution, coupled with steps to ease the transition for businesses and low-income residents. 

The Governor’s Climate Legislative and Executive Workgroup (CLEW), a bi-partisan group convened by Governor Jay Inslee, is scheduled to make recommendations this month on actions to meet state climate commitments. 

“Some legislators have raised concerns about the financial and economic uncertainty of key climate strategies proposed by the Governor, and argue we should wait for more analysis. British Columbia provides us with a ready model: since setting a cost on carbon in 2008, climate pollution in BC is down and economic growth surpassing that of peer provinces. Now is the time to act,” said Mercer Island Mayor Bruce Bassett. 

“We are on the cusp of decisions that must be made now if we are to have a sustainable environment and economy for our future,” said Executive Constantine. “We support the Governor’s work to outline clear commitments for state action on climate change. We can’t afford to wait.”

“Our residents want a healthy environment and sustainable economy and community for their kids and grandkids. Cities are taking on the climate challenge through tough decisions on housing and transportation, and we seek a similarly strong commitment by the state of Washington,” stated Kirkland Mayor Joan McBride.

“Cities like Issaquah are requiring buildings to be energy efficient and focus growth around transit, but even these actions will not be enough to meet the state and local climate goals.  The state and local governments all need to be pulling in the same direction,” noted Mayor Ava Frisinger of Issaquah.

“Snoqualmie’s historic downtown, a state highway, and essential public services like schools face growing flood impacts each winter.  In addition, a projected decreasing snowpack threatens regional water supplies, hydropower and our local snow-ski industry. Consequently, we welcome stronger state action on climate change,”

said Mayor Matthew Larson of Snoqualmie.  

Read the joint letter and learn more about climate action by King County and cities at:

http://goo.gl/vdDZlQ

Learn more about climate actions by King County and cities at: www.kingcounty.gov/climate.



King County Executive
Dow Constantine
Dow constantine portrait

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