Skip to main content
Most King County offices will be closed on Monday, for Memorial Day.  
King County logo

Reptiles and Amphibians in King County

Herp Species in King County

The table below summarizes the amphibian and reptile species, called herpetofauna, or "herps," found in the County. For a longer discussion on the individual species and their ranges in the County, see page 65 in the County's Biodiversity Report.

Species

amphibian

reptile

Bullfrog*

x

Cascades Frog

x

Common Garter Snake

x

Ensatina

x

Green Frog*

x

Long-toed Salamander

x

Northern Alligator Lizard

x

Northwestern Garter Snake

x

Northwestern Salamander

x

Pacific Giant Salamander

x

Pacific Treefrog (Pacific Chorus Frog)

x

Painted Turtle*

x

Red-legged Frog

x

Roughskin Newt

x

Rubber Boa

x

Slider*

x

Tailed Frog

x

Western Fence Lizard

x

Western Redback Salamander

x

Western Terrestrial Garter Snake

x

Western Toad

x

Total

12

8

Spotted Frog – historically present

x

* = Introduced (2 amphibian; 2 reptiles)

frog40pxFor information on the above herps, visit Washington Natural Heritage Program's Washington Herp Atlas. The atlas provides the most current information available on Washington's herpetofauna including information on life history, habitat, status, threats, management concerns and distribution.

Metamorphosis

This series of images illustrates the life history of a Pacific Treefrog (also called a Chorus Frog) all the way through metamorphosis from egg to tadpole to adult.

The set of photos on this page illustrates some of our local amphibian species as adults along with their eggs.

Reptiles

In King County, we only have six native reptile species, and three of those are garter snakes -- like the one pictured below.

garter_close

The Year of the Frog

2008 was the Year of the Frog. The main goal of this campaign was to generate public awareness and understanding of the amphibian extinction crisis. Learn all about amphibians, the perils they currently face, and the state of the frogs at Amphibian Ark. Even though 2008 is a distant memory, it's always a good time to learn more about frogs.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) also supports the Year of the Frog. See the USFWS web page on the Year of the Frog. Check out this issue of their 48-page Endangered Species Bulletin (PDF), which features frogs from all over the U.S.

Related information

Related agencies

Featured

October 22, 2015
Blog, Burke Museum
What's Endangering Amphibians? 

January 21, 2009
External article, Seattle Times

Sprawl flattens frogs, other amphibians struggling to survive

May 2, 2008
External article, Associated Press

Deadly fungus threatens state's frogs, salamanders