Skip to main content
King County logo

What is it?

Green, brown and clear glass food and beverage containers are all recyclable. Once crushed into “cullet” and sold, it may be remanufactured into new glass containers, or used as aquarium gravel, a sandblasting medium, in landscaping, drain pipe bedding or asphalt paving.

Why recycle glass?

Not only is it easy to recycle, glass it can be recycled indefinitely with no loss in quality or purity. Making new glass from old glass saves energy because recycled glass is processed at a lower temperature than glass made from raw materials.

King County waste stream graph
Eighty percent of materials thrown away are resources – not waste.

Using recycled glass to make new glass saves money and reduces air pollution, such as fly ash and nitrogen oxides (NOX) that can be toxic to the environment.

What can you do?

  • If you are not signed up for curbside garbage collection, consider doing so. In most cases, recycling service is included in the price.
  • If you self-haul, drop glass and other recyclables off at the free recycling section of the transfer station.
  • Use the What do I do with…? website to locate a private facility that will accept your glass and other recyclables.

Related information

  • King County’s Zero Waste program is a guiding principle for all waste reduction and recycling programs.
  • Recycle More. It's Easy To Do. Although most King County residents say they participate in their curbside recycling program, more than half of what ends up in the Cedar Hills Regional Landfill is readily recyclable.
  • Compost More. Waste Less. Food scraps and food soiled paper break down into compost, a soil amendment that enriches soil and improves plant health.
  • King County’s Zero Waste program is a guiding principle for all waste reduction and recycling programs.
Contact Us

 Call: 206-477-4466

TTY Relay: 711

Fax: 206-296-0197

King County Solid Waste Division mission: Waste Prevention, Resource Recovery, Waste Disposal