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Click on each stage of the plastic lifecycle below to learn more:

click to learn about: Collection click to learn about: Transportation click to learn about: Sorting click to learn about: Reprocessing click to learn about: Natural resource extraction click to learn about: Manufacturing click to learn about: Consumption click to learn about: Reuse click to learn about: End of Life Management

Click on each stage of the plastic lifecycle below to learn more:

click to learn about: Collection click to learn about: Transportation click to learn about: Sorting click to learn about: End of Life Management click to learn about: Reprocessing click to learn about: Natural resource extraction click to learn about: Manufacturing click to learn about: Consumption click to learn about: Reuse

Click on each stage of the plastic lifecycle below to learn more:

click to learn about: Collection click to learn about: Transportation click to learn about: Sorting click to learn about: End of Life Management click to learn about: Reprocessing click to learn about: Natural resource extraction click to learn about: Manufacturing click to learn about: Consumption click to learn about: Reuse

King County has a Zero Waste of Resources by 2030 goal referenced in King County Code (KCC 10.14.020), the Strategic Climate Action Plan, and 2019 Comprehensive Solid Waste Management Plan. In 2019, plastics comprised of more than 14% of what was disposed at Cedar Hills Regional Landfill. This represents a significant wasted resource that could be prevented upstream, or recovered and transformed into a new product.

Only approximately 9% of the plastic that is manufactured get recycled and made into new products. Plastic waste pollutes the land and waterways, harming natural resources and animals, especially sea life. Reusing or recycling plastics can displace virgin materials, reducing the need to extract these materials and the amount of greenhouse gases emitted from the production of goods.

King County, not including Seattle, recycles about 21,000 tons of plastic each year; in King County, about 113,000 tons of plastic end up at Cedar Hills Regional Landfill.  It is crucial to reduce the life-cycle environmental impacts of plastics products and foster appropriate management of plastic materials. The county's goal is to seek out markets and improve recycling streams. It focuses on exploring programs and activities that offer a comprehensive approach to managing plastic materials domestically.

King County is a member of the U.S. Plastics Pact external link and the Sustainable Packaging Coalition external link

image depicting the lifecycle of plastic products
Plastic lifecycle

 Recycling info

Residents and businesses:
Search What do I do with…? for local plastic recycling information.

 Stay in touch

Have questions about the LinkUp program? Contact Andy Smith contact info for Andy Smith – Program Manager

Contact Us

 Call: 206-477-4466

TTY Relay: 711

King County Solid Waste Division mission: Waste Prevention, Resource Recovery, Waste Disposal