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Presented annually by the King County Executive. The Awards are named for Governor John D. Spellman who was King County’s first Executive Officer and responsible for the creation of the King County Historic Preservation Program and Landmarks Commission.

Executive Constantine honors historic property advocates with John D. Spellman Awards

Recipients of the 2018 John D. Spellman Awards for Exemplary Achievement in Historic Preservation were honored October 11 in a celebration led by King County Executive Dow Constantine at the Auburn Masonic Temple in downtown Auburn. The awards are named in honor of John D. Spellman, former King County Executive and Washington Governor, who established the County’s Historic Preservation Program in 1980.

Left: Dorothy Reeck, Roanoke Inn Tavern owner, with Executive Constantine. Credit: Todd Johnstone. Right: Executive Constantine, Auburn Mayor Nancy Backus, Preservation Officer Jennifer Meisner, and Auburn Masonic Lodge members. Credit: Todd Johnstone

The 2018 recipients of Spellman Awards for historic preservation are:

Patricia Cosgrove, in recognition of dedication to the cultural heritage of Auburn and south King County. During her nearly 30-year tenure with the City of Auburn, Patricia oversaw the White River Valley Museum’s development into a regional facility featuring award-winning exhibits about culture, arts, and history. Cosgrove led restoration of the historic Mary Olson Farm in Auburn, raising $2 million for the project. The farm reopened in 2011 and is now visited by more than 2,000 students annually.

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Patricia Cosgrove training volunteers at Mary Olson Farm. Credit: Holly Taylor

Auburn Masonic Lodge, for restoration of the 1924 King Solomon Masonic Temple. Designed in the Italian Renaissance Revival style by noted Tacoma architecture firm Heath, Gove and Bell, the Temple building has continuously served as a lodge hall. The first floor housed many different commercial uses over the years, including Taylor Lemar Mortuary and National Bank of Commerce. The Lodge recently repointed the brick and restored several storefronts using historic photos as guides.

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Restored storefronts in the Auburn Masonic Temple building. Credit: KCHPP

The Tupper family, for stewardship of their historic Gothic arch barn, which stands as a visual landmark on the Enumclaw Plateau and has been in the family for three generations. The barn was built by Harry Tupper in the mid-1940s. It stored hay and sheltered cattle for the next 70 years. A $26,000 grant from King County’s “Barn Again” grant program helped the family stabilize and rehabilitate the barn and extend the life of this working farm.

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Tupper Barn with new siding and a new roof. Credit: Stan Olenginski

Sammamish Heritage Society, for its commitment to preserving historic resources on the Sammamish Plateau in the face of tremendous development pressures. The City of Sammamish is less than 20 years old but the area has a 150-year history that the heritage society works diligently to protect by disseminating historic information, surveying the remaining historic properties, and working with the city to develop procedures to guide treatment of historic buildings.

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Sammamish Heritage Society members advocating for preservation. Credit: KCHPP

Roanoke Inn, in recognition of the Inn’s continued contribution to Mercer Island’s cultural and community identity for more than a century. Built in 1914 by George McGuire for visitors arriving at the island’s Roanoke Dock, the building originally housed a chicken-dinner inn called The Roanoke. It has operated as a classic tavern and mainstay in the Mercer Island community since the end of Prohibition and has been owned and operated by members of the Reeck family - changing very little - since 1943. The Roanoke Inn is the first Spellman Awardee for a Legacy Business.

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The Roanoke Inn Tavern, on Mercer Island. Credit: KCHPP

2017 Winners

Recipients of the 2017 John D. Spellman Awards for Exemplary Achievement in Historic Preservation were honored October 18 in a celebration led by King County Executive Dow Constantine at the historic Kirkland Woman’s Club in downtown Kirkland. The awards are named in honor of John D. Spellman, former King County Executive and Washington Governor, who established the County’s Historic Preservation Program in 1980.  The 2017 recipients are:


City of Kirkland, for identifying and planning for the protection of Kirkland’s historic resources.  In the last few years the City has continually updated their historic resources inventory with regular surveys, including newly annexed areas, and the City’s most significant mid-century modern buildings.  The City has implemented zoning regulations that help maintain the character of historic neighborhoods while accommodating development, and worked with preservation advocates to find a creative alternative to demolition of the historically significant Trueblood House.

Stacey Kroeze, for restoration of original features of the Barton House in Kent’s Mill Creek Historic District.  Stacey was awarded a 4Culture grant to restore intricate exterior details of the second floor.  Her project is encouraging other homeowners in the district to restore and maintain their historic homes.  Even the smallest of restorations can make a huge difference in the character of a neighborhood.    

Fall City Historical Society, for innovative programming and educating the public about Fall City’s heritage and historic resources.   Their active board has implemented an ambitious program of educational activities, events, and projects.  The society is also the primary steward of the 1886 Fall City Hop Shed, ensuring this landmark structure is stabilized and appropriately interpreted. 

Diana Keller, for rehabilitation of the Hill Crest Barn near Carnation.  The barn has been in her family since the 1970s, and she has taken on the task of getting it back in working shape.  Diana was awarded King County “Barn Again” grants to lift the barn, install a new foundation and floor slab, and to replace siding and repaint the barn its glorious barn red. Contributing both cash match and much of the labor herself, Diana has restored this important community asset and visual landmark in the Snoqualmie Valley.    

2015 Winners

Assistant Deputy County Executive Rhonda Berry recognized recipients of the 2015 John D. Spellman Preservation Awards for Exemplary Achievement in Historic Preservation on September 24th at the North Bend Theatre in North Bend, WA.

  • Julie Koler — for career achievement and in recognition of her leadership and development of innovative programs to preserve King County's cultural heritage.
  • Steve & Georgia Teodosaidis — for exemplary achievement in the façade restoration of Bellinger's Bakery.
  • Bassetti Architects — for exemplary achievement in compatible design and incorporation of Ronald School into the new Shorewood High School.
  • King County Road Services Division — for exemplary achievement in mitigation and interpretation related to the 14th Avenue Bridge Replacement Project.
  • City of Des Moines — for exemplary achievement in restoring the Des Moines Beach Park dining hall after an earthquake, floods, and multiple agency approvals.

2014 Winners

Assistant Deputy County Executive Rhonda Berry recognized recipients of the 2014 John D. Spellman Preservation Awards for Exemplary Achievement in Historic Preservation on May 15th at the Keewaydin Clubhouse on Mercer Island.

  • Colonel Carl B. Lind, U.S. Army, Retired — for career achievement in public service and selfless dedication to making a positive difference in the cultural life of King County and Washington.
  • Leon Leeds, Ph.D. — for career achievement in archaeology and for his advocacy and action that paved the way for the protection of archaeological resources in King County.
  • King County Wastewater Treatment Division’s Environmental Planning Team — for excellence in cultural resource planning and compliance and for their proactive stewardship of the county’s cultural resources.
  • New Community Church — for adaptive reuse of the Olof and Matilda Olson Barn, a Maple Valley icon, as a worship center and community meeting place.
  • Neely Mansion Association — for the outstanding restoration of the Aaron Neely House near Auburn, including the recent restoration of the ornate porches.
  • Teddy Jo Ryder and Charlie Brown — for their commitment to reconstructing the Whistling Post, an important Skykomish gathering place, after a disastrous fire.

2013 Winners

King County Executive Dow Constantine recognized recipients of the 2013 John D. Spellman Awards for Exemplary Achievement in Historic Preservation at a joint awards ceremony with the Association of King County Historical Organizations on April 23rd at the Museum of History & Industry.

  • City of Des Moines – for the exacting restoration of the Des Moines Beach Park Auditorium, a significant mid-century community meeting hall.
  • VFW Post 5760, Mercer Island – for rehabilitation and stewardship of the 1922 Keewaydin Clubhouse, an important island gathering place.
  • Camp Korey at Carnation Farm – for the outstanding adaptive reuse of several buildings at this once world-renowned dairy farm into a state-of-the-art summer camp for children with life-threatening and serious illnesses.
  • Sammamish Heritage Society – for their persistent and effective advocacy for the preservation of the Jacob & Emma Reard House, one of the last farmhouses on the Sammamish Plateau.

2012 Winners

King County Executive Dow Constantine recognized recipients of the 2012 John D. Spellman Awards for Exemplary Achievement in Historic Preservation on May 24th at the Old Redmond Schoolhouse.