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Click on each stage of the compost lifecycle below to learn more:

click to learn about: Collection/transportation click to learn about: Composting/processing click to learn about: Compost distribution click to learn about: Soil amendments click to learn about: Plant life click to learn about: Plant life click to learn about: Food donation click to learn about: Distribution/consumption click to learn about: Food waste/yard waste

Click on each stage of the compost lifecycle below to learn more:

click to learn about: Collection/transportation click to learn about: Composting/processing click to learn about: Compost distribution click to learn about: Soil amendments click to learn about: Plant life click to learn about: Food donation click to learn about: Distribution/consumption click to learn about: Food waste/yard waste

Click on each stage of the compost lifecycle below to learn more:

click to learn about: Collection/transportation click to learn about: Composting/processing click to learn about: Compost distribution click to learn about: Soil amendments click to learn about: Plant life click to learn about: Food donation click to learn about: Distribution/consumption click to learn about: Food waste/yard waste

King County has a Zero Waste of Resources by 2030 goal referenced in King County Code (KCC 10.14.020), the Strategic Climate Action Plan, and 2019 Comprehensive Solid Waste Management Plan. Recovering organic material is an essential part of reaching this goal. In 2019, organic materials comprised more than 30% of what was disposed at Cedar Hills Regional Landfill. This represents a significant wasted resource that could be prevented upstream, or recovered and transformed into a new product, such as compost.

Amending soil with compost has many benefits and supports a regional circular economy for organics.

  • Compost grows healthy plants, reducing use of pesticides that can end up in our surface waters. It keeps soil loose, so stormwater infiltrates, and filters pollutants from runoff.
  • Compost prevents soil erosion and compaction.
  • Compost stimulates plant growth and health.
  • Compost helps plants thrive with less frequent irrigation and survive drought.
  • Compost reduces maintenance, fertilizer and pesticide expenses.
  • Compost improves plant survival in low-maintenance and naturalized projects.
  • Using compost is essential to achieving King County's waste recycling and environmental quality goals.
  • Composting keeps organic waste out of the landfill, helping King County meet its goal of Zero waste of resources by 2030.
  • Diverting waste compost reduces greenhouse gases, helping King County reach its goals outlined in its Strategic Climate Action Plan.
  • To encourage the use of compost and build strong regional markets, King County's CompostWise program provides tools and resources for the procurement and application of compost to regional public agencies.
  • If you are a regional public agency and want to learn more about this program, email compost@kingcounty.gov.
Compost lifecycle

 Recycling info

Residents and businesses:
Search What do I do with…? for local organics recycling information.

 Using compost?

CompostWise logo

Visit CompostWise for tips, resources, and policies for public agencies.

 Stay in touch

Have questions about the LinkUp program? Contact Andy Smith contact info for Andy Smith – Program Manager

Contact Us

 Call: 206-477-4466

TTY Relay: 711

King County Solid Waste Division mission: Waste Prevention, Resource Recovery, Waste Disposal