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Education resources

Wastewater

Stormwater

Other- 2021 Sustainable Yard Care Series: King County and Snohomish Conservation District 

Wastewater/ Stormwater

Water

Other

Wastewater

Stormwater

Natural Yard Care

Wastewater

Stormwater

  • King County Stormwater Programs (4th-12th grade; in-classroom and at Brightwater & South Treatment Plant)
  • IslandWood (at Brightwater): Landforms Investigation (Elementary) - Students will conduct field investigation in the Brightwater Center natural area, studying erosion, deposition, properties of streams, and run-off.
  • Nature Vision: School ProgramsMultiple hour field experiences with Nature Vision educators at a local stream or wetland site. Students will engage in water quality testing, ecology walks, invertebrate dips, and group games designed to promote interest in water conservation or stormwater pollution prevention. 
  • Mercer Slough Environmental Education Center: Water Testing (Secondary) - Don gloves and goggles as you determine the pH and dissolved oxygen levels of water samples from Mercer Slough. What do these tests tell about the health of the ecosystem?

The following titles are available from the King County Library System:

Books

Films

Songs

Wastewater treatment in King County

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Emerging issues

New information is continually emerging about the natural and synthetic chemicals people dispose of every day in their sinks and toilets. While scientists nationally and internationally study the effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs), King County is taking several preventive steps to protect public health and the environment (refer to fact sheet).

Downloads and resources

Studies have shown that pharmaceuticals and chemicals in our personal care products (shampoos, lotions, perfume, bug sprays) are present in our nation's waterbodies. Research suggests that certain chemicals in drugs and personal care products may cause ecological harm.

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other organizations are committed to investigating this topic and developing strategies to help protect the health of both the environment and the public. To date, scientists have found no evidence of adverse human health effects from PPCPs in the environment. Learn more about: