Skip to main content

Sewer rate and capacity charge

Sewer rate and capacity charge

How is the rate and capacity charge set?

Sewer rate

The Wastewater Treatment Division sends its rate proposal to the King County Executive each spring. After review, the rate proposal goes to the King County Council for further deliberation. The council is required to adopt the sewer rate by June 30 for the following year. King County's overarching goal is to keep rates level for several consecutive years whenever possible. The county's regional wastewater utility runs on only revenues from the rates we charge our customer agencies. It does not use any tax money for wastewater collection, treatment and reclamation. View frequently asked questions.

Under long-term agreements with local sewer agencies in its service area, King County charges each agency a monthly amount for providing wastewater treatment. That amount is based on King County's monthly sewer rate and the number of customers served by the local agency. In turn, the local agencies bill the residences, businesses and industries in their wastewater collection system to recover the county charge plus the amount needed to operate their local collection systems.

The 2024 monthly sewer rate is $55.11 for single-family residences. The charge for multifamily, commercial, and industrial customers is $55.11 for each 750 cubic feet of water used.

Capacity charge

Since 1990, King County has levied a capacity charge on new connections to the sewer system, which these new customers pay in addition to their monthly sewer bill. The capacity charge helps King County cover the cost of sewer improvement and expansion projects needed to serve new growth.

Newly connecting customers are directly billed by King County for the capacity charge.

Elected officials, sewer utility representatives, and jurisdiction officials were all involved in King County's decision to implement a capacity charge to ensure that "growth pays for growth." Learn more about the capacity charge program.

2024
County's wholesale monthly sewer rate $55.11
*Monthly capacity charge $74.23
*Listed rates are for 1 residential customer equivalent (RCE) per month. Capacity charge rates go into effect for new sewer hook-ups on or after January 1 each year.

Frequently asked questions

Local sewer agencies collect wastewater from residences and businesses and transport it to King County's regional system of pipelines, tunnels, and treatment plants. The amount the local utility pays King County for this service is based on the current wholesale monthly sewer rate and the number of customers the local utility serves.

The monthly sewer rate you pay to your local utility includes the county's monthly wholesale rate, plus the rate set by your local sewer utility to cover its costs in building, operating and maintaining its local collection system. This also explains why your monthly bill comes from your local sewer utility instead of King County - because people do not connect directly to our regional sewer system.

The local agencies decide how to bill customers in their area. Some use a set price that directly includes King County's rate. Others base their rates on amount of water a customer uses. And others use a combination of the two.

King County's wastewater service area extends into Snohomish and Pierce counties.

In 1958 the voters created Metro and developed a regional wastewater treatment system based on watersheds as opposed to political boundaries. In 1994, King County assumed authority of Metro and its legal obligation to treat wastewater for 34 local jurisdictions and local sewer agencies that contract with King County.

The local sewer agencies that contract with King County manage, operate and maintain 5,100 miles of collection pipes along with numerous pump and regulator stations. The local agencies collect wastewater from residences and businesses and transport it to King County's regional system of pipelines, tunnels, and treatment plants.

The monthly sewer rate you pay to your local utility includes the county's monthly wholesale rate, plus the rate set by your local sewer utility to cover its costs in building, operating and maintaining its local collection system.

This also explains why your monthly bill comes from your local sewer utility instead of King County - because people do not connect directly to our regional sewer system. (King County does directly bill newly connecting customers for the capacity charge they pay in addition to their monthly sewer bill - for more information see the next FAQ).

Property owners do not connect directly to King County's regional wastewater system. Local sewer agencies collect wastewater and contract with King County to convey and treat it at one of our regional treatment plants. Local sewer agencies decide where and when to build or extend service lines.

Wastewater treatment service is provided only within designated urban growth areas, with few exceptions. These areas are designated as part of the state's Growth Management Act and local comprehensive plans. Because of those plans, we expect most homes and businesses within the urban growth boundary will likely have sewer service within the next two decades. But the exact timing would be up to the local agencies.

Local agencies may not require a home to hook up to the sewer system if the septic system is working properly. Depending on individual circumstances, hooking up to the sewer can be less expensive than building a new septic system or replacing a failed system. Contact your local government or sewer district to find out more about what is planned for your area.

Note: the Growth Management Act requires coordinated planning so that the services required by new residents and their homes and businesses are available as growth occurs. Needed services include many that are not provided by King County, such as water supply, local sanitary sewers, fire protection, schools, energy facilities, and telecommunications. King County does provide services such as regional wastewater treatment, regional solid waste management, and local stormwater management. For more information, refer to the King County Comprehensive Plan ("Services, facilities, and utilities" chapter).

  • The sewer rate supports operations and maintenance. The monthly wholesale sewer rate paid by all customers generates the revenue we need to cover the cost of maintaining, operating and supporting our existing system, and covering debt service on the bonds we issue to fund the capital improvement program.
  • The capacity charge supports system expansion. Since 1990, King County has levied a capacity charge for customers with new connections, additions or change of use, to the sewer system, which these new customers pay in addition to their monthly sewer bill. The capacity charge helps King County cover the cost of sewer improvement and expansion projects needed to serve new growth. Newly connecting customers are directly billed by King County for the capacity charge. Elected officials, sewer utility representatives and jurisdiction officials were all involved in King County's decision to implement a capacity charge to ensure that "growth pays for growth". For more information, view frequently asked questions about the sewage treatment capacity charge.
Many of the local sewage agencies in King County have programs for residents with low incomes. Check with the sewer utility that sends you a bill to see if you are eligible. Information on local sewer agencies is available here.
expand_less